Young people need help entering motoring industry, expert says

Young people have a passion to get involved in the motoring industry but often struggle to find a way in, according to Tokunbo Ajasa-Oluwa.

The head of GoThinkBig, an organisation designed to help young people find the right career for them, said that motoring had been identified as one of nine main areas in which people aged between 18 and 30 want to find work. Alongside industries like fashion, music and technology, motor trade and automotive manufacturing were found to be popular job choices, but he said there are still many barriers that stop them pursuing this path.

For young people starting out in the motor trade industry, one barrier they might face is obtaining a road risks insurance policy; some insurers are reluctant to offer policies to under 21s while those under 25 can still expect to pay higher rates. Furthermore, employers looking to take on young members of staff should consider whether or not to have them as named drivers on their motor trade insurance policy as this could increase the price of a quote.

From sales through to manufacturing and repairs, there is huge scope for young people to work in the motoring industry. However, it is also a career that requires specialist skills and training – gaining access to this training can often be the challenge. Fortunately, an increasing number of businesses are recognising the value that younger staff can bring to their enterprises and more and more people are setting up training resources such as apprenticeships. These processes are proving vital to helping young people into the sector, offering them experience and the opportunity to build up their no-claims bonuses for their insurance policies.

GoThinkBig’s Mr Ajasa-Oluwa explained: “Among the biggest hurdles for young people looking for experience or employment is the lack of insight or opportunity.

“They may have a considerable passion for motoring, but don’t have a clue how to work on the sales or service side of a car brand. Their contact networks are limited; no one in their family has experience, so the dream never becomes reality.”

He implores more businesses to offer work experience opportunities to help combat this problem.